A New Secrecy Issue at GTMO

A new secrecy issue has arisen during the Military Commission hearings in Guantanamo.

Judge Pohl, presiding over the Military Commission prosecution of Al Nashiri, alleged to be the Mastermind behind the Cole bombing in 2000, had ordered that the details of his treatment while in CIA custody be shared with the defense. The order required that the information be available to the defense under the same requirements as the other classified evidence already provided to them.
The prosecution has recently argued that Judge Pohl’s order should be set aside and the details of the treatment of Al Nasir remain secret from the al-Nashiri defense team. The prosecution’s basis for setting the order aside was because the Senate Intelligence Committee summary might reveal some of those same information and perhaps obviating the need for the disclosures to the defense or at least permit a new review by Judge Pohl after the Senate Intelligence Committee response plays its way out.
Currently there is no announced determination of when the Senate Summary will be released. It is currently undergoing a classification review by the Department of Justice. At present there is no date for the report to be released or any knowledge of the extent if any that the report may contain the information that the defense has sought and has previously been granted by Judge Pohl.
Al Nashiri is scheduled to be the first Military Commission trial of any of the detainees brought to Guantanamo after the CIA Dark sites were closed. The trial is currently scheduled to begin in January.
The prosecution is seeking the death penalty and the defense intends to have the jury consider the extent to which the government treated its client before he arrived in Guantanamo. That treatment, according to the New York Times report by Charles Savage that “the C.I. A. inspector general called his the ‘most significant’ case of a detainee who was brutalized in ways that went beyond the tactics approved by the Bush administration, including being threatened with a power drill.” An expert on treatment of torture called by the defense has already stated that Al-Nashiri had been subjected to physical, psychological and sexual torture The defense considers the manner in which he was tortured during his detention in the CIA dark sites to be relevant to whether or not the death penalty should be impose.presiding over the Military Commission prosecution of Al Nashiri, alleged to be the Mastermind behind the Cole bombing in 2000, had ordered that the details of his treatment while in CIA custody be shared with the defense. The order required that the information be available to the defense under the same requirements as the other classified evidence already provided to them.
The prosecution has recently argued that Judge Pohl’s order should be set aside and the details of the treatment of Al Nasir remain secret from the al-Nashiri defense team. The prosecution’s basis for setting the order aside was because the Senate Intelligence Committee summary might reveal some of those same information and perhaps obviating the need for the disclosures to the defense or at least permit a new review by Judge Pohl after the Senate Intelligence Committee response plays its way out.
Currently there is no announced determination of when the Senate Summary will be released. It is currently undergoing a classification review by the Department of Justice. At present there is no date for the report to be released or any knowledge of the extent if any that the report may contain the information that the defense has sought and has previously been granted by Judge Pohl.

The prosecution is seeking the death penalty and the defense intends to have the jury consider the extent to which the government treated its client before he arrived in Guantanamo. That treatment, according to the New York Times report by Charles Savage that “the C.I. A. inspector general called his the ‘most significant’ case of a detainee who was brutalized in ways that went beyond the tactics approved by the Bush administration, including being threatened with a power drill.” An expert on treatment of torture called by the defense has already stated that Al-Nashiri had been subjected to physical, psychological and sexual torture The defense considers the manner in which he was tortured during his detention in the CIA dark sites to be relevant to whether or not the death penalty should be imposed.

Professor Mark Denbeaux, Director
Center for Policy & Research
 

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