Police Unit That Spied on Muslims Is Disbanded

The New York Times reports that:

“The New York Police Department has abandoned a secretive program that dispatched plainclothes detectives into Muslim neighborhoods to eavesdrop on conversations and built detailed files on where people ate, prayed and shopped, the department said. Continue reading

The FBI: Accountable to No One

In the lead up to this year’s Boston Marathon, there has inevitably been an influx of coverage examining the status of the case of the Tsnarnaev brothers, more colloquially known as last year’s “Boston Marathon Bombers. One of the more interesting issues to have bubbled to the surface in the midst of all of this news coverage lack of accountability within the FBI, the agency who allegedly had information on the Tsnarnaev brothers’ extremist activities prior to the attacks. In this recent Boston Globe article, journalist Kevin Cullen highlights the transparency issue within the FBI; the FBI is not even accountable to Congress, so there are zero repercussions for the agency (aside from negative press) when they slip up and fail to thoroughly investigate a suspect, such as Tamerlan Tsarnaev. Continue reading

How do we define terrorism?

Last week’s shootings at Fort Hood have once again raised a seemingly simple question;

How do we define terrorism?

In the wake of the 2009 Fort Hood shootings, the Army and White House were hesitant to classify the tragedy as terrorism. Instead, the attack was labeled an incident of workplace violence, much to the disappointment of survivors and their advocates. In an article published earlier this week, The New York Times points out that the “t-word” was carefully avoided in reference to both Fort Hood shootings, but quickly associated with last year’s Boston Marathon bombings. Continue reading

The NSA Does Not Equate to An Orwellian Society

Earlier this week, my colleague and co-founder of this blog, Paul Taylor, published a post highlighting the role of the media in propagating misconceptions of veterans’ mental health. In yet another example of the media influencing the average citizens’ perceptions of current events and hot topics, a study was recently released identifying George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four as the only literary reference used to help explain NSA surveillance, a hot topic in the media over the course of the past year. Continue reading

Media Irresponsibility is Hurting Veterans

News broke this past Wednesday afternoon of yet another tragic mass shooting at Fort Hood, the second in the base in just five years. While TransparentPolicy‘s primary focus is the United States’ response to foreign terrorist threats, this is an issue that warrants our attention, largely in part to the widespread implications the news coverage of these events will have on the general public’s perception of service members and military veterans, which will ultimately affect the long-term well being of those who have served our country in the post-9/11 military. Continue reading

Senate Panel Votes to Reveal CIA Report

On Thursday, the Senate Intelligence Committee voted to declassify the executive summary and conclusions from its report on the CIA’s Detention and Interrogation Program. Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), charwoman of the committee, released a written statement, stating that “[t]he report exposes a brutality that stands in stark contrast to our values as a nation…. This is not what Americans do.” Continue reading

DOD to Examine Nuclear Forces

Several weeks ago, Secretary Chuck Hagel called for reviews of the U.S.’s nuclear forces and in doing so, emphasized the need for a closer examination of the structure and conduct of its personnel. These reviews have been ordered in response to a number of recent scandals associated with nuclear armed forces in recent months, including a cheating scandal on the Air Force’s monthly nuclear proficiency exam, as well as Major Gen. Michael Carey’s dismissal from his supervisory role over intercontinental ballistics missiles after gross misconduct and binge drinking while on an official trip to Moscow. Continue reading

Federal Courts v. Military Commissions: The Debate Isn’t Over

After last week’s conviction of Bin Laden’s son-in-law Sulaiman Abu Ghaith in Federal Court, Attorney General Eric Holder issued a statement praising the trial as a demonstration that Federal Court is the proper venue for high-profile terrorism cases. As I cited in a post earlier this week, Holder said of the trial:

“We never doubted the ability of our Article III court system to administer justice swiftly in this case, as it has in hundreds of other cases involving terrorism defendants. It would be a good thing for the country if this case has the result of putting that political debate to rest. This outcome vindicates the government’s approach to securing convictions against not only this particular defendant, but also other senior leaders of al Qaeda.” Continue reading

The White House’s Handling of the Ukranian Crisis

From a national security perspective, the current Ukranian crisis serves as an unparalleled means to highlight the way in which the White House deals with a global crisis.

Abu Ghaith Convicted

Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, Bin Laden’s son-in-law, was convicted this week of conspiring to kill Americans and a series of other terror-related charges.

Abu Ghaith, was indicted nearly a year ago in The Southern District of New York, just a few blocks from the World Trade Center site, for his role in the September 11th attacks and as a senior associate of Bin Laden. Since news of Abu Ghaith’s indictment was first released last March, there has been a great deal of debate regarding whether SDNY was the appropriate forum for the trial. While many believed SDNY could hold a fair, safe trial for such a high-profile case, many opponents believed a military commission was a far more appropriate venue. Continue reading