CIA whistleblower/leaker John Kiriakou foils government plot to retaliate against him

John Kiriakou, the former CIA clandestine officer who was recently sent to Loretto Federal Corrections Institute on charges of leaking the identity of a fellow CIA officer, has written a letter to the public about his experiences in prison. Kiriakou maintains that his prosecution for the leak was in retaliation for his whistleblowing on the Enhanced Interrogation Techniques (or EITs) which most now consider to be torture.

While the letter is a very interesting view into life in a federal prison, the event that takes pride of place is an incident in which the prison’s internal security personnel attempted to trick Kiriakou into getting into a fight with another inmate. However, it would seem that tricking a former operative of the US Clandestine Service is not as easy as they thought.

According to Kiriakou, the Special Investigative Service (or SIS), which investigates crimes or other breaches at the prison, pulled Kiriakou into their office to tell him that another inmate was the uncle of the Times Square Bomber, and had received orders from Pakistan to kill Kiriakou. Instead of being intimidated, Kiriakou, who had by this time made friends with just about everyone in the prison, simply walked up to the guy and talked to him. As it turns out, the SIS had told the other inmate (who had nothing to do with the Times Square Bomber) that Washington had ordered Kiriakou to kill him. Kiriakou postulates that the purpose of this plot was to get them to fight and thus produce an excuse to send them both to solitary.

Needless to say, if this story is true, it is should be a scandal. Even if the SIS were operating entirely independently and hatched this half-baked plot on their own, the use of a federal office to not only incite violence, but also to endanger a former CIA officer would be an unforgivable breach of the public trust. So far, little has been reported on this, or anything else related to Kiriakou’s  time in prison.

Paul W. Taylor, Senior Fellow
Center for Policy & Research

Panetta Says the US Didn’t Need EIT’s to Get UBL

Over the past few weeks, the film “Zero Dark Thirty” has undoubtedly brought heightened  attention to the United States’ hunt for bin Laden (UBL).  In the film, some of the more shocking scenes include those in which the main characters, CIA agents, are interrogating detainees at various detention facilities.  The film shows some of the more frequently discussed EIT’s, or Enhanced Interrogation Techniques (arguably, just a more palatable euphemism for torture), including waterboarding, sleep deprivation, food deprivation, stress positions, blasting loud music, and playing off the detainees’ fears and cultural beliefs.

Regardless of whether director Kathryn Bigelow took artistic license when developing these scenes in the film, it is indisputable that EIT’s have been regularly used by the United States in the decade that has passed since the 9/11 attacks.  With the secrecy that shrouded the mission leading to the capture of UBL, it is only natural that the public is hungry for the details regarding how the intelligence leading to that fateful night in Abbottabad .

In an interview on “Meet the Press” that aired Sunday night, outgoing Defense Secretary Leon Panetta said that the search for UBL included piecing together a great deal of disparate information, and admitted that some of the information came from EIT’s, saying “Yes, some of it came from some of the tactics that were used at that time – interrogation tactics that were used.”

However, he continued on to say “I think we could have gotten Bin Laden without [EIT's]“- essentially revealing that the controversial EIT’s were not necessary to achieve the United States’ most significant accomplishment thus far in the Great War on Terror, capturing UBL.