Al Darbi Pleads Guilty

Alexandra Kutner is currently at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba on behalf of the Center for Policy and Research 

Ahmed Mohammed Ahmed Haza al Darbi spoke in both English and Arabic as he answered judge Air Force Col. Mark L. Allred’s questioning on Thursday. Clutching his prayer beads, al Darbi, a Saudi Arabian national, pled guilty to having joined with other members of al Qaeda in planning and preparing attacks against civilian oil tankers in Southwest Asian Waters. While al Darbi entered Court Room 1 knowing he was going to plead guilty to the charges, he listened attentively to each question and the detailing of every element of his charges. Despite being captured during the actual attack of the MV Limburg, al Darbi acknowledged today that he was complicit in the plot that lead to the explosion. Al Darbi will likely spend between 9 and 15 additional years in prison, possibly in his home country of Saudi Arabia.

There has been speculation that Al Darbi will testify against Nashiri, accused of plotting the 2000 attack on the USS Cole, in his upcoming trial, but this has been neither confirmed nor denied at this time.  Al Darbi is the sixth detainee to plead guilty at the military commissions and the first Saudi convicted of terror charges.

Alexandra Kutner, Research Fellow
Center for Policy and Research

Al Nashiri Keeps Kammen, Speaks of Frustrations

Alexandra Kutner is currently at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to observe proceedings in the al Nashiri case on behalf of the Center for Policy and Research.

Alleged architect of the USS Cole bombing Abd al Rahim al Nashiri’s motion hearing went off without a hitch yesterday morning. Al Nashiri met with his learned counsel Rick Kammen after the court recessed on Monday, and the pair appear to have worked out whatever problems led to al Nashiri’s attempt to fire Kammen. Al Nashiri spoke unshackled to the court, apologizing for the delay. Continue reading

Al Nashiri Loses Faith in Counsel

Alexandra Kutner is currently at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to observe proceedings in the al Nashiri case on behalf of the Center for Policy and Research.

Clean shaven Saudi detainee Abd al Rahim al Nashiri, accused of being the architect of the 2000 USS Cole bombing in Yemen, merely swiveled in his chair during his seven-minute stay in court. Al Nahsiri’s learned counsel, Rick Kammen, spoke on his behalf, explaining to the court that Nashiri had lost confidence in him and wanted him removed from the case. In hopes of preserving their relationship, Kammen requested two days to attempt to reconcile the relationship. Judge Pohl agreed to grant Kammen time to speak with al Nashiri and recessed until Wednesday. If the two cannot repair their relationship, al Nashiri is ultimately allowed to fire Kammen under current military commission rules. Continue reading

DoD Announces Detainee’s Charges After Ten Years of Detention at Guantanamo

Last week, the Department of Defense announced the charges against detainee Ahmed Mohammed Ahmed Haza al Darbi, who will be charged by a military commission for aiding and abetting conduct that resulted in the suicide bombing of the civilian oil tanker M/V LIMBURG near al Mukallah, Yemen, on October 6, 2002. This is the first time that al Darbi, who has been held as a detainee at GTMO for nearly eleven years, has been charged since his arrival at the detention center. According to his charge sheet, al Darbi is accused of attacking civilians, attacking civilian objects, hazarding a vessel, terrorism, attempted hazarding a vessel, and attempted terrorism.

Be sure to follow TransparentPolicy for more info on al Darbi’s upcoming trial as it becomes available.

 

Guantanamo News: 9/11 Case Delayed

Yesterday, officials at Guantanamo Bay announced that United States v. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, et al. a.k.a the 9/11 trials, will be delayed until at least April. The case has been at a standstill since December when the presiding judge, Army Col. James Pohl, decided to adjourn to determine the mental status of one of the detainees on trial. Continue reading

Declassification of KSM Manifesto Provides a Platform for Extremism

As I discussed at length last week, high-value detainee Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (“KSM”) recently drafted a manifesto, which was turned over to GTMO officials in October and declassified earlier this month by Judge Pohl. It is my personal opinion, however, that this “manifesto” should not have been released at all, in any form. Continue reading

KSM Releases Lengthy ‘Nonviolence’ Manifesto, Shows Nothing Has Changed

 

High-value Guantanamo detainee Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (“KSM”) has released a 36-page ‘nonviolence’ manifesto, filled with deeply extremist religious ramblings and advocating that Muslims should avoid using violence to spread Islam. What KSM fails to realize however, is that, while what he likely means is avoiding force, his hate-filled, extremist rant is nonetheless promoting violence, hate, and intolerance.  Continue reading

Benghazi Review Demonstrates the Transparency Promised by the Obama Administration

Earlier this morning, I posted briefly on the Benghazi report issued yesterday by the Senate Intelligence Committee (the report itself was approved about a month ago, but was only declassified yesterday). Several news outlets, including The New York Times, have pointed out that the report is “broadly consistent with the findings of previous inquiries into the attack on Sept. 11, 2012.” Continue reading

Penny Lane: Are Guantanamo Detainees Really the “Worst of the Worst?”

In 2002, former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld stated that GTMO was populated by the “worst of the worst,” citing GTMO detainees as some of the most dangerous terrorists in the world. The Center for Policy and Research, however, published a report in March 2011, citing substantial evidence regarding the true recidivist rates of GTMO detainees pointing to the fact that these men were not nearly as dangerous as the U.S. originally claimed. Continue reading

Lawyers Permitted to Photograph Guantanamo Detainee KSM’s Scars

In a piece published in yesterday’s Miami Herald, noted Guantanamo journalist Carol Rosenberg announced that military judge James Pohl will allow defense attorneys to photograph the scars on the wrists and ankles of accused 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheik Mohammed (“KSM”) and his co-defendant Walid bin Attash. This is a significant development, as it could be used in the trial of KSM and his alleged 9/11 co-conspirators to demonstrate that the men were subjected to torture while they were being held in U.S. custody at Guantanamo Bay Detention Center. Continue reading