The FBI: Accountable to No One

In the lead up to this year’s Boston Marathon, there has inevitably been an influx of coverage examining the status of the case of the Tsnarnaev brothers, more colloquially known as last year’s “Boston Marathon Bombers. One of the more interesting issues to have bubbled to the surface in the midst of all of this news coverage lack of accountability within the FBI, the agency who allegedly had information on the Tsnarnaev brothers’ extremist activities prior to the attacks. In this recent Boston Globe article, journalist Kevin Cullen highlights the transparency issue within the FBI; the FBI is not even accountable to Congress, so there are zero repercussions for the agency (aside from negative press) when they slip up and fail to thoroughly investigate a suspect, such as Tamerlan Tsarnaev. Continue reading

US Considering Drone Strike Against Citizen

Yesterday afternoon, the Associated Press reported that the US is currently tracking an American citizen and terrorist suspect in Pakistan. While officials have not confirmed the identity of the man, they described him as an “al Qaeda facilitator” who is currently plotting attacks against the United States. Now the Obama administration is struggling with the question of whether to use the controversial drone program to eliminate him. Continue reading

Developing Story: Obama to Give 11 a.m. Speech Calling for Overhaul of NSA Data Collection Program

It has been announced that President Obama will speak at 11 a.m. regarding his plans to overhaul the NSA data collection program. Continue reading

Benghazi Review Demonstrates the Transparency Promised by the Obama Administration

Earlier this morning, I posted briefly on the Benghazi report issued yesterday by the Senate Intelligence Committee (the report itself was approved about a month ago, but was only declassified yesterday). Several news outlets, including The New York Times, have pointed out that the report is “broadly consistent with the findings of previous inquiries into the attack on Sept. 11, 2012.” Continue reading

Panetta Inadvertently Reveals Secrets of bin Laden Raid to “Zero Dark Thirty” Screenwriter Mark Boal

As many of my colleagues at the Center for Policy & Research know, I am a big fan of Kathryn Bigelow’s 2012 film Zero Dark Thirty. Billed as a film about “The Greatest Manhunt in History,” the film chronicles the CIA’s decade-long hunt for Osama bin Laden, centered around the efforts of a female CIA operative named simply “Maya.” Continue reading

Secret Periodic Review Board Hearings Limit Transparency at Guantanamo Bay Detention Center

This week, the Pentagon began notifying would-be observers of the first Guantanamo Periodic Review Board hearing, scheduled for November 20th, that the hearing (and all subsequent hearings) will be held in secret. The announcement highlights the challenges government officials face as they try to balance their commitment to transparency with the perceived national security risks associated with public hearings. Given the amount of classified information addressed in these hearings, it is impossible for the government to ever achieve true transparency throughout this process, leaving the public to question whether our country’s purported commitment to justice is being upheld at Guantanamo. Continue reading

Drone Strikes Remain in CIA Territory

Six months after the White House announced that drone strikes would move from the CIA’s authority to the DoD, new reports state that the transfer will not be happening any time in the near future.  President Obama originally claimed that the transfer was meant to increase transparency and open up debate in regard to the controversial drone strikes across the Middle East.  While many will undoubtedly criticize the delay, the situation may not be as bad as it appears on its face.  In fact, it may be that keeping drone strike capabilities in the hands of the CIA will actually be a positive in the long run. Continue reading

Drone Strikes Linked to More Civilian Deaths

Despite claims that drone strikes in Pakistan have been effective and efficient, new reports are set to come out later this week that link the drone campaign with high civilian casualty rates, raising questions regarding the United State’s transparency in the ongoing drone war.   Continue reading

Libyan Terror Suspect al-Liby Transferred to United States: Medical Reasons, or PR Damage Control?

The United States announced yesterday that Libyan terror suspect Abu Anas al-Liby (also known as Nazih al-Ragye) has been transferred to the United States after being held and interrogated aboard a U.S. Navy ship since his capture in Tripoli on October 5th. He is being held as a suspect in the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania which killed 224 civilians. A criminal indictment was filed against him in 2001 for his suspected involvement in the embassy bombings, but he has evaded capture for over a decade. Continue reading

A Week at Guantanamo Bay

In August of 2013 I had the opportunity to travel to Guantanamo Bay to represent Seton Hall Law’s Center for Policy and Research as an NGO observer at the 9/11 trials.  In particular, I was able to watch one of many pretrial hearings in the case of the United States v. Mohammed, in which Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (KSM), Walid Muhammad Salih Mubarak Bin ‘Attash, Ramzi Binalshibh, Ali Abdul Aziz Ali (AKA al-Baluchi), and Mustafa Ahmed Adam al Hawsawi are named as defendants.  The five detainees are accused of plotting the 9/11 attacks that lead to the deaths of nearly 3,000 people in New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania.

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