US Considering Drone Strike Against Citizen

Yesterday afternoon, the Associated Press reported that the US is currently tracking an American citizen and terrorist suspect in Pakistan. While officials have not confirmed the identity of the man, they described him as an “al Qaeda facilitator” who is currently plotting attacks against the United States. Now the Obama administration is struggling with the question of whether to use the controversial drone program to eliminate him. Continue reading

Guantanamo News: 9/11 Case Delayed

Yesterday, officials at Guantanamo Bay announced that United States v. Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, et al. a.k.a the 9/11 trials, will be delayed until at least April. The case has been at a standstill since December when the presiding judge, Army Col. James Pohl, decided to adjourn to determine the mental status of one of the detainees on trial. Continue reading

Death Penalty Sought for Boston Marathon Bomber Tsarnaev

Yesterday afternoon, prosecutors in the Boston Marathon bombing case announced that Attorney General Eric Holder has authorized them to seek the death penalty against Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, one of two suspects believed to have carried out the bombing. Tsarnaev’s older brother Tamerlan and second suspect was killed by police during a fire fight shortly after the bombing. Continue reading

Declassification of KSM Manifesto Provides a Platform for Extremism

As I discussed at length last week, high-value detainee Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (“KSM”) recently drafted a manifesto, which was turned over to GTMO officials in October and declassified earlier this month by Judge Pohl. It is my personal opinion, however, that this “manifesto” should not have been released at all, in any form. Continue reading

KSM Releases Lengthy ‘Nonviolence’ Manifesto, Shows Nothing Has Changed

 

High-value Guantanamo detainee Khalid Sheikh Mohammed (“KSM”) has released a 36-page ‘nonviolence’ manifesto, filled with deeply extremist religious ramblings and advocating that Muslims should avoid using violence to spread Islam. What KSM fails to realize however, is that, while what he likely means is avoiding force, his hate-filled, extremist rant is nonetheless promoting violence, hate, and intolerance.  Continue reading

New Senate Report Calls Benghazi Attack Preventable

A report analyzing the September 2012 Benghazi attack was released yesterday by the Senate Intelligence Committee. The document ultimately concludes that the attack was preventable, and argues that the State Department failed to boost security in response to intelligence warnings leading up to the attack. Continue reading

Colleen “Jihad Jane” LaRose Sentenced

Colleen LaRose, better known as “Jihad Jane,” was sentenced to ten years in federal prison last week. LaRose was convicted on multiple terrorism-related counts, most notably for her role in plotting the murder of a Swedish cartoonist who depicted the Islamic Prophet Muhammad as a dog in a political cartoon. Prosecutors allegedly sought a more serious sentence but U.S. District Judge Petrese Tucker lightened LaRose’s punishment based in part on her renouncement of her crimes. Continue reading

Penny Lane: Are Guantanamo Detainees Really the “Worst of the Worst?”

In 2002, former Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld stated that GTMO was populated by the “worst of the worst,” citing GTMO detainees as some of the most dangerous terrorists in the world. The Center for Policy and Research, however, published a report in March 2011, citing substantial evidence regarding the true recidivist rates of GTMO detainees pointing to the fact that these men were not nearly as dangerous as the U.S. originally claimed. Continue reading

Congress Battling Over NSA Reform

As the debate over the NSA surveillance scandal rages on, two Congressional committees are now in the midst of a battle that will determine who gets the first crack at reforming the NSA’s intelligence gathering policies.  The battle between the House Intelligence Committee and House Judiciary Committee will largely determine the extent to which the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) will be modified in the post-Snowden era.  While much is still unclear, a historical comparison to the Pike and Church Committees from the Cold War era may well demonstrate which stance the government should take on NSA reforms. Continue reading

Secret Periodic Review Board Hearings Limit Transparency at Guantanamo Bay Detention Center

This week, the Pentagon began notifying would-be observers of the first Guantanamo Periodic Review Board hearing, scheduled for November 20th, that the hearing (and all subsequent hearings) will be held in secret. The announcement highlights the challenges government officials face as they try to balance their commitment to transparency with the perceived national security risks associated with public hearings. Given the amount of classified information addressed in these hearings, it is impossible for the government to ever achieve true transparency throughout this process, leaving the public to question whether our country’s purported commitment to justice is being upheld at Guantanamo. Continue reading